Know Your Rights….Voter Intimidation Laws By State

2016-10-22_17-44-30

With Donald Trump telling his supporters to go poll watch and intimidate voters, it’s important to know the laws of your state. If you see voter fraud or voter intimidation on election day, here’s what you do….


According to the U.S Code 18, sub-section 594, voter intimidation is defined as,

“Whoever intimidates, threatens, coerces, or attempts to intimidate, threaten, or coerce, any other person for the purpose of interfering with the right of such other person to vote or to vote as he may choose, or of causing such other person to vote for, or not to vote for, any candidate for the office of President, Vice President, Presidential elector, Member of the Senate, Member of the House of Representatives, Delegate from the District of Columbia, or Resident Commissioner, at any election held solely or in part for the purpose of electing such candidate, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.”

Poll watching has always been part of our electoral process but it’s important to understand when poll watching legally turns into voter intimidation or voter fraud. Donald Trump and his supporters don’t seem to understand this, but in this country there are strict laws and rules that regulate the process.

Each state is different so I will list the specific rules for each state below. You can see your state rules on who exactly is allowed to poll watch HERE.

If you see someone breaking your state laws on Voter Fraud, Voter Intimidation, or other Election Crimes, here’s what you do…

First of all, bring your phone. If someone tries to harass or intimidate you, take their picture and report it to one of the links below.

Many states have strengthened their voter ID requirements in the past few years to try to curb voter fraud.

If you suspect that voter fraud has occurred, report it to your state or territorial election office. You can also report it to:

If you witness or suspect voter intimidation or suppression, you can report it to your state or territorial election office or to the Voting Section of the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice. You can also use this online Election Complaint Report form.

State Laws Prohibiting Electioneering Activities at Polling Places….

Alabama: 

Except as electors are admitted to vote and persons to assist them as herein provided, and except for the judge of probate, the sheriff,
or his or her deputy, the precinct election officials, and watchers, no person shall be permitted within 30 feet of the door of the building
of the polling place. Electioneering or campaigning is permitted outside the polling place. However, this activity must not be closer than
30 feet to the entrance of the polling place (Alabama Code § 17-9-50; Alabama Secretary of State FAQs)

Alaska:

During the hours the polls are open, a person who is in the polling place or within 200 feet of any entrance to the polling place may not attempt to persuade a person to vote for or against a candidate, proposition, or question. (Alaska Stat. §§ 15-15-170) A person commits the offense of campaign misconduct in the third degree if…the person is within 200 feet of an entrance to a polling place, and violates AS 15.15.170; or circulates cards, handbills, or marked ballots, or posts political signs or posters relating to a candidate at an election or election proposition or question. (Alaska Statutes § 15-56-016).

Arizona:

A person who knowingly electioneers on election day within a polling place or in a public manner within seventy-five feet of the main outside entrance of a polling place or on-site early voting location is guilty of a class 2 misdemeanor. (Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-1018(1)) A person shall not be allowed to remain inside the seventy-five foot limit while the polls are open, except for the purpose of voting…and no electioneering may occur within the seventy-five foot limit. For the purposes of this section, electioneering occurs when an individual knowingly, intentionally, by verbal expression and in order to induce or compel another person to vote in a particular manner or to refrain from voting expresses support for or opposition to a candidate who appears on the ballot in that election, a ballot question that appears on the ballot in that election or a political party with one or more candidates who appear on the ballot in that election. (Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 16-515(A); (H))

Arkansas:

No person shall hand out or distribute or offer to hand out or distribute any campaign literature or any literature regarding any candidate or issue on the ballot, solicit signatures on any petition, solicit contributions for any charitable or other purpose, or do any electioneering of any kind whatsoever in the building or within one hundred feet (100′) of the primary exterior entrance used by voters to the building containing the polling place on election day (Ark. Code Ann. § 7-1-103(9)(A))

California:

No person, on election day, or at any time that a voter may be casting a ballot, shall, within 100 feet of a polling place…a) circulate an initiative, referendum, recall, or nomination petition or any other petition; (b) solicit a vote or speak to a voter on the subject of marking his or her ballot; c) place a sign relating to voters’ qualifications or speak to a voter on the subject of his or her qualifications…(d) do any electioneering as defined by Section 319.5. As used in this section, “100 feet of a polling place…” means a distance 100 feet from the room or rooms in which voters are signing the roster and casting ballots. Any person who violates any of the provisions of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor. (California Elections Code Ann. § 18370) “Electioneering” means the visible display or audible dissemination of information that advocates for or against any candidate or measure on the ballot within 100 feet of a polling place… Prohibited electioneering information includes, but is not limited to, any of the following: (a) a display of a candidate’s name, likeness, or logo; (b) a display of a ballot measure’s number, title, subject, or logo; (c) buttons, hats, pencils, pens, shirts, signs, or stickers containing electioneering information; (d) dissemination of audible electioneering information. (California Elections Code Ann. § 319.5)

Colorado:

No person shall do any electioneering on the day of any election within any polling place or in any public street or room or in any public manner within one hundred feet of any building in which a polling place is located. As used in this section, the term “electioneering” includes campaigning for or against any candidate who is on the ballot or any ballot issue or ballot question that is on the ballot. “Electioneering” also includes soliciting signatures for a candidate petition, a recall petition, or a petition to place a ballot issue or ballot question on a subsequent ballot.” Any person who violates any provision of this section is guilty of a misdemeanor. (Colo. Rev. Stat. § 1- 13-714)

Connecticut:

On the day of any primary, referendum or election, no person shall solicit on behalf of or in opposition to the candidacy of another or himself or on behalf of or in opposition to any question being submitted at the election or referendum, or loiter or peddle or offer any advertising matter, ballot or circular to another person within a radius of seventy-five feet of any outside entrance in use as an entry to any polling place or in any corridor, passageway or other approach leading from any such outside entrance to such polling place or in any room opening upon any such corridor, passageway or approach…. (Conn. Gen. Stat. § 9-236)

Delaware:

No election officer, challenger or any other person within the polling place or within 50 feet of the entrance to the building in which the voting room is located shall electioneer during the conduct of the election. For the purposes of this section… “electioneering” includes political discussion of issues, candidates or partisan topics, the wearing of any button, banner or other object referring to issues, candidates or partisan topics, the display, distribution or other handling of literature or any writing or drawing referring to issues, candidates or partisan topics, the deliberate projection of sound referring to issues, candidates or partisan topics from loudspeakers or otherwise into the polling place or the area within 50 feet of the entrance to the building in which the voting room is located. (Del. Code Ann. tit. 15, § 4942(a); (d))

Florida:

No person, political committee, committee of continuous existence, or other group or organization may solicit voters inside the polling place or within 100 feet of the entrance to any polling place, or polling room where the polling place is also a polling room, or early voting site. For the purpose of this subsection, the terms “solicit” or “solicitation” shall include, but not be limited to, seeking or attempting to seek any vote, fact, opinion, or contribution; distributing or attempting to distribute any political or campaign material, leaflet, or handout; conducting a poll except as specified in this paragraph; seeking or attempting to seek a signature on any petition; and selling or attempting to sell any item. (Fla. Stat. § 102.031(4)(a); (b))

Georgia:

No person shall solicit votes in any manner or by any means or method, nor shall any person distribute or display any campaign material, nor shall any person solicit signatures for any petition or conduct any exit poll or public opinion poll with voters on any day in which ballots are being cast: (1) within 150 feet of the outer edge of any building within which a polling place is established; (2) within any polling place; or (3) within 25 feet of any voter standing in line to vote at any polling place. Campaign material means any newspaper, booklet, pamphlet, card, sign, paraphernalia, or any other written or printed matter referring to: A candidate whose name appears on the ballot in a primary or election; a referendum which appears on the ballot in a primary or election; or a political party or body which has a nominee or nominees on the ballot in a primary or election. Campaign material shall not include any written or printed matter that is used exclusively for the personal and private reference of an individual elector during the course of voting. (Ga. Code Ann. § 21-2-2; 21-2-414(a))

Hawaii:

Any person who remains or loiters within an area of two hundred feet from the perimeter of the polling place and its appurtenances for the purpose of campaigning shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. Within the appropriate boundary as established in subsection (a), and the building in which the polling place is located, the display or distribution of campaign posters, signs, or other campaign materials for the purpose of soliciting votes for or against any person or political party or position on a question is prohibited. Any voter who displays campaign material in the polling place shall remove or cover that material before entering the polling place. (Hawaii Statutes § 11- 132(a); (d)) Any person, including candidates carrying on any campaign activities within the area described in section 11-132…for the purpose of influencing votes shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. Campaign activities shall include the following: (a) any distribution, circulation, carrying, holding, posting, or staking of campaign cards, pamphlets, posters and other literature; (b) the use of public address systems and other public communication media; (c) The use of motor caravans or parades; and (d) the use of entertainment troupes or the free distribution of goods and services. (Hawaii Statutes § 19-6(7))

Idaho:

On the day of any primary, general or special election, no person may, within a polling place, or any building in which an election is being held, or within one hundred (100) feet thereof: (a) do any electioneering; (b) circulate cards or handbills of any kind; (c) solicit signatures to any kind of petition; or (d) engage in any practice which interferes with the freedom of voters to exercise their franchise or disrupts the administration of the polling place. (Idaho Code § 18-2318(1))

Illinois:

No judge of election, pollwatcher, or other person shall, at any primary or election, do any electioneering or soliciting of votes or engage in any political discussion within any polling place, within 100 feet of any polling place, or, at the option of a church or private school, on any of the property of that church or private school that is a polling place (10 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 5/17-29(a))

Indiana:

A person who knowingly does any electioneering on election day within the polls, or the chute…commits a Class A misdemeanor. “Electioneering” includes expressing support or opposition to any candidate or political party or expressing approval or disapproval of any public question in any manner that could reasonably be expected to convey that support or opposition to another individual. The term does not include expressing support or opposition to a candidate or a political party or expressing approval or disapproval of a public question in material mailed to a voter or a telephone or an electronic communication with a voter. (Ind. Code § 3-14-3-16). “Chute” means the area or pathway that extends fifty (50) feet in length, measured from the entrance to the polls. (Ind. Code § 3-5-2- 10)

Iowa:

A person commits the crime of election misconduct in the third degree if the person willfully commits any of the following acts….on election day: loitering, congregating, electioneering, posting signs, treating voters, or soliciting votes, during the receiving of the ballots, either on the premises of a polling place or within three hundred feet of an outside door of a building affording access to a room where the polls are held, or of an outside door of a building affording access to a hallway, corridor, stairway, or other means of reaching the room where the polls are held. (Iowa Code § 39A.4(1)(a)(1))

Kansas:

Electioneering is knowingly attempting to persuade or influence eligible voters to vote for or against a particular candidate, party or question submitted. Electioneering includes wearing, exhibiting or distributing labels, signs, posters, stickers or other materials that clearly identify a candidate in the election or clearly indicate support or opposition to a question submitted election within any polling place on election day or advance voting site during the time period allowed by law for casting a ballot by advance voting or within a radius of 250 feet from the entrance thereof. Electioneering shall not include bumper stickers affixed to a motor vehicle that is used to transport voters to a polling place or to an advance voting site for the purpose of voting. (Kan. Stat. Ann. § 25-2430(a))

Kentucky:

No person shall electioneer at the polling place on the day of any election…within a distance of one hundred (100) feet of any entrance to a building in which a voting machine is located if that entrance is unlocked and is used by voters on election day. Electioneering shall include the displaying of signs, the distribution of campaign literature, cards, or handbills, the soliciting of signatures to any petition, or the solicitation of votes for or against any bona fide candidate or ballot question in a manner which expressly advocates the election or defeat of the candidate or expressly advocates the passage or defeat of the ballot question, but shall not include exit polling, bumper stickers affixed to a person’s vehicle while parked within or passing through a distance of one hundred (100) feet of any entrance to a building in which a voting machine is located, private property …, or other exceptions established by the State Board of Elections through the promulgation of administrative regulations. (Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 117.235(3))

Louisiana:

Except as otherwise specifically provided by law, it shall be unlawful for any person…to perform or cause to be performed any of the following acts within any polling place being used in an election on election day…or within a radius of six hundred feet of the entrance to any polling place being used in an election on election day: (1) to solicit in any manner or by any means whatsoever any other person to vote for or against any candidate or proposition being voted on in such election; (2) to remain within any such polling place…or within a radius of six hundred feet of the entrance of any such polling place, except when exercising the right to vote, after having been directed…to leave the premises or area of a polling place; (3) to hand out, place, or display campaign cards, pictures, or other campaign literature of any kind or description whatsoever; (4) to place or display political signs, pictures, or other forms of political advertising; (5) to circulate a recall petition or seek handwritten signatures to a recall petition. (Louisiana Rev. Statutes § 18-1462(A)).

Maine:

On public property within 250 feet of the entrance to the voting place as well as within the voting place itself, a person may not Influence another person’s decision regarding a candidate or question that is on the ballot for the election that day; or attempt to influence another person’s decision regarding a candidate or question that is on the ballot for the election that day. These limitations do not prohibit a candidate from attending the voting place and orally communicating with voters as long as the candidate does not attempt to influence their vote. A candidate may not state the name of the office sought or request a person’s vote. (21-A Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 682(2)) A person may not display advertising material; operate an advertising medium, including a sound amplification device; or distribute campaign literature, posters, palm cards, buttons, badges or stickers containing a candidate’s name or otherwise intending to influence the opinion of any voter regarding a candidate or question that is on the ballot for the election that day on any public property located within 250 feet of the entrance to either the voting place or the building in which the registrar’s office is located. This subsection does not apply to advertising material on automobiles traveling to and from the voting place for the purposes of voting. It does not prohibit a person who is at the polls solely for the purpose of voting from wearing a campaign button when the longest dimension of the button does not exceed 3 inches. (21-A Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 682(3)).

Maryland:

Maryland law prohibits electioneering within 100 feet of the entrance or exit to a polling place on Election Day. The 100-foot “No Electioneering” zone is measured from the entrance/exit of the building closest to the room in which voting actually takes place. No electioneering means that no canvassing, electioneering, campaigning, or posting of any campaign material is permitted within the zone. “Posting of any campaign material” includes wearing clothing shirt, hat, sticker, or button that indicates support of or opposition to any candidate, question, or political party if worn by any person allowed to remain in the ‘No Electioneering” zone. However, electioneering does not apply to a voter going to vote in his or her polling place. A person on his or her way to vote may wear campaign paraphernalia or carry campaign literature if the voter leaves the zone promptly after voting. (Maryland State Board of Elections Summary Guide to Candidacy and Campaign Finance Laws Chapter 12.6; Md. Ann. Code Art. 33, § 16-206 )

Massachusetts:

Within 150 feet of a polling place…no person shall solicit votes for or against, or otherwise promote or oppose, any person or political party or position on a ballot question, to be voted on at the current election. No campaign material intended to influence the vote of a voter in the ongoing election, including campaign literature, buttons, signs, and ballot stickers, may be posted, exhibited, circulated, or distributed in the polling place, in the building where it is located, on the building walls, on the premises where the building stands, or within 150 feet of an entrance door to the building. ( 950 CMR 53.03(18); 54.04.22))

Michigan:

An election inspector or any other person in a polling room, in a compartment connected to a polling room, or within 100 feet from any entrance to a building in which a polling place is located shall not persuade or endeavor to persuade a person to vote for or against any particular candidate or party ticket or for or against any ballot question that is being voted on at the election. A person shall not place or distribute stickers, other than stickers provided by the election officials pursuant to law, in a polling room, in a compartment connected to a polling room, or within 100 feet from any entrance to a building in which a polling place is located. A person shall not solicit donations, gifts, contributions, purchase of tickets, or similar demands, or request or obtain signatures on petitions in a polling room, in a compartment connected to a polling room, or within 100 feet from any entrance to a building in which a polling place is located. On election day, a person shall not post, display, or distribute in a polling place, in any hallway used by voters to enter or exit a polling place, or within 100 feet of an entrance to a building in which a polling place is located any material that directly or indirectly makes reference to an election, a candidate, or a ballot question. (Mich. Comp. Laws § 168.744 (1); (3)) A person shall not, while the polls are open on an election day, solicit votes in a polling place or within 100 feet from an entrance to the building in which a polling place is located. (Mich. Comp. Laws § 168.931(1)(b)(iii)(k))

Minnesota:

A person may not display campaign material, post signs, ask, solicit, or in any manner try to induce or persuade a voter within a polling place or within 100 feet of the building in which a polling place is situated, or anywhere on the public property on which a polling place is situated, on primary or election day to vote for or refrain from voting for a candidate or ballot question. A person may not provide political badges, political buttons, or other political insignia to be worn at or about the polling place on the day of a primary or election. A political badge, political button, or other political insignia may not be worn at or about the polling place on primary or election day. (Minn. Stat. § 211B.11)) No one except an election official or an individual who is waiting to register or to vote or an individual who is conducting exit polling shall stand within 100 feet of the building in which a polling place is located. (Minn. Stat. § 204C.06)

Mississippi:

It shall be unlawful for any candidate for an elective office, or any representative of such candidate, or for any proponent or opponent of any constitutional amendment, local issue or other measure printed on the ballot to post or distribute cards, posters or other campaign literature within one hundred fifty (150) feet of any entrance of the building wherein any election is being held. (Miss. Code. Ann. § 23-15-895) A space thirty (30) feet in every direction from the polls, or the room in which the election is held, shall be kept open and clear of all persons except the election officers and two (2) challengers. (Miss. Code. Ann. § 23-15-245)

Missouri:

The following offenses…are deemed misdemeanor: exit polling, surveying, sampling, electioneering, distributing election literature, posting signs or placing vehicles bearing signs with respect to any candidate or question to be voted on at an election on election day inside the building in which a polling place is located or within twenty-five feet of the building’s outer door closest to the polling place, or, on the part of any person, refusing to remove or permit removal from property owned or controlled by him, any such election sign or literature located within such distance on such day after request for removal by any person. (Mo. Rev. Stat. § 15-637(18))

Montana:

A person may not do any electioneering on election day within any polling place or any building in which an election is being held or within 100 feet of any entrance to the building in which the polling place is located, which aids or promotes the success or defeat of any candidate or ballot issue to be voted upon at the election. On election day, a candidate, a family member of a candidate, or a worker or volunteer for the candidate’s campaign may not distribute alcohol, tobacco, food, drink, or anything of value to a voter within a polling place or a building in which an election is being held or within 100 feet of an entrance to the building in which the polling place is located. A person may not buy, sell, give, wear, or display at or about the polls on an election day any badge, button, or other insignia which is designed or tends to aid or promote the success or defeat of any candidate or ballot issue to be voted upon at the election. A person within a polling place or any building in which an election is being held may not solicit from an elector, before or after the elector has marked a ballot and returned it to an election judge, information as to whether the elector intends to vote or has voted for or against a candidate or ballot issue. (Mont. Code. Ann. § 13-35-211)

Nebraska:

No person shall do any electioneering, circulate petitions, or perform any action that involves solicitation within any polling place or any building designated for voters to cast ballots by the election commissioner or county clerk pursuant to the Election Act while the polling place or building is set up for voters to cast ballots or within two hundred feet of any such polling place or building. Any person violating this section shall be guilty of a Class V misdemeanor. (Neb. Rev. Stat. § 32-1524(2))

Nevada:

It is unlawful inside a polling place or within 100 feet from the entrance to the building or other structure in which a polling place is located: (a) for any person to solicit a vote or speak to a voter on the subject of marking the voter’s ballot; (b) for any person, including an election board officer, to do any electioneering on election day. The provisions of subsection 1 do not apply to the conduct of a person in a private residence or on commercial or residential property that is within 100 feet from the entrance to a building or other structure in which a polling place is located. As used in this section, “electioneering” means campaigning for or against a candidate, ballot question or political party by: (a) posting signs relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question or political party; (b) distributing literature relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question or political party; (c) using loudspeakers to broadcast information relating to the support of or opposition to a candidate, ballot question or political party; (d) buying, selling, wearing or displaying any badge, button or other insigne which is designed or tends to aid or promote the success or defeat of any political party or a candidate or ballot question to be voted upon at that election; or (e) soliciting signatures to any kind of petition. (Nev. Rev. Stat. § 293.740)

New Hampshire:

No person shall distribute, wear, or post at a polling place any campaign material in the form of a poster, card, handbill, placard, picture, pin, sticker, circular, or article of clothing which is intended to influence the action of the voter within the building where the election is being held. No person who is a candidate for office or who is representing or working for a candidate shall distribute any campaign materials or perform any electioneering activities or any activity which affects the safety, welfare and rights of voters within a corridor 10 feet wide and extending a distance from the entrance door of the building as determined by the moderator where the election is being held. (N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 659:43)

New Jersey:

If a person shall on election day tamper, deface or interfere with any polling booth or obstruct the entrance to any polling place, or obstruct or interfere with any voter, or loiter in or near the polling place, or, with the purpose to obstruct or interfere with any voter or to unduly delay other voters from voting, spend an inordinate amount of time in the polling booth, or do any electioneering within any polling place or within one hundred feet thereof, he shall be guilty of a crime of the third degree. (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 19:34-6) If a person shall distribute or display any circular or printed matter or offer any suggestion or solicit any support for any candidate, party or public question within the polling place or room or within a distance of one hundred feet of the outside entrance to such polling place or room, he shall be guilty of a disorderly persons offense. (N.J. Stat. Ann. § 19:34-15)

New Mexico:

Electioneering too close to the polling place consists of any form of campaigning within: (1) one hundred feet of the building in which the polling place is located on election day when voting at a school, church or private residence; and (2) one hundred feet of the door through which voters may enter to vote at the office of the county clerk, an alternate voting location, a mobile voting site or any location used as a polling place on election day that is not a school, church or private residence. Electioneering includes the display or distribution of signs or campaign literature, campaign buttons, t-shirts, hats, pins or other such items and includes the verbal or electronic solicitation of votes for a candidate or question. Whoever commits electioneering too close to the polling place is guilty of a petty misdemeanor. (N.M. Stat. Ann. § 1-20-16)

New York:

While the polls are open no person shall do any electioneering within the polling place, or in any public street, within a one hundred foot radial measured from the entrances designated by the inspectors of election, to such polling place or within such distance in any place in a public manner; and no political banner, button, poster or placard shall be allowed in or upon the polling place or within such one hundred foot radial. (N.Y. Election Law § 8-104(1))

North Carolina:

No person or group of persons shall hinder access, harass others, distribute campaign literature, place political advertising, solicit votes, or otherwise engage in election‑related activity in the voting place or in a buffer zone which shall be prescribed by the county board of elections around the voting place. In determining the dimensions of that buffer zone for each voting place, the county board of elections shall, where practical, set the limit at 50 feet from the door of entrance to the voting place, measured when that door is closed, but in no event shall it set the limit at more than 50 feet or at less than 25 feet. Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, the county board of elections shall also provide an area adjacent to the buffer zone for each voting place in which persons or groups of persons may distribute campaign literature, place political advertising, solicit votes, or otherwise engage in election-related activity (N.C. Gen. Stat. § 163-166.4).

North Dakota:

An individual may not ask, solicit, or in any manner try to induce or persuade, any voter within a polling place or within one hundred feet [30.48 meters] from the entrance to the room containing a polling place while it is open for voting to vote or refrain from voting for any candidate or the candidates or ticket of any political party or organization, or any measure submitted to the people. The display upon motor vehicles of adhesive signs which are not readily removable and which promote the candidacy of any individual, any political party, or a vote upon any measure, and political advertisements promoting the candidacy of any individual, political party, or a vote upon any measure which are displayed on fixed permanent billboards, may not, however, be deemed a violation of this section. A vehicle or movable sign of any type containing a political message may be allowed to remain within the restricted area only for the period of time necessary for the owner or operator of the vehicle or sign to complete the act of voting. Except as provided in subsection 1, a sign placed on private property which displays a political message may not be restricted by a political subdivision, including a home rule city or county, unless the political subdivision demonstrates a burden to the public safety. (N.D. Cent. Code § 16.1-10-06).

Ohio:

Two or more small flags of the United States approximately fifteen inches in length along the top, which shall be placed at a distance of one hundred feet from the polling place on the thoroughfares or walkways leading to the polling place, to mark the distance within which persons other than election officials, observers, police officers, and electors waiting to mark, marking, or casting their ballots shall not loiter, congregate, or engage in any kind of election campaigning. Where small flags cannot reasonably be placed one hundred feet from the polling place, the presiding election judge shall place the flags as near to one hundred feet from the entrance to the polling place as is physically possible. Police officers and all election officials shall see that this prohibition against loitering and congregating is enforced. (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 3501.30(A)(4)) During an election and the counting of the ballots, no person shall do any of the following: (1) loiter, congregate, or engage in any kind of election campaigning within the area between the polling place and the small flags of the United States placed on the thoroughfares and walkways leading to the polling place, and if the line of electors waiting to vote extends beyond those small flags, within ten feet of any elector in that line…(5) solicit or in any manner attempt to influence any elector in casting the elector’s vote. (Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 3501.35)

Oklahoma:

Any person who electioneers within three hundred (300) feet of any ballot box while an election is in progress, and any person except election officials and other persons authorized by law who remains within fifty (50) feet of any ballot box while an election is in progress shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor. (Oklahoma Statutes 26-16-111).

Oregon:

A person may not do any electioneering, including circulating any cards or handbills, or soliciting of signatures to any petition, within any building in which any state or local government elections office designated for the deposit of ballots under ORS 254.470 is located, or within 100 feet measured radially from any entrance to the building. A person may not do any electioneering by public address system located more than 100 feet from an entrance to the building if the person is capable of being understood within 100 feet of the building. The electioneering need not relate to the election being conducted. This subsection applies during the period beginning on the date that ballots are mailed to electors…and ending on election day at 8 p.m. or when all persons waiting in line at the building who began the act of voting…by 8 p.m. have finished voting. (Or. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 260.695).

Pennsylvania:

No person, when within the polling place, shall electioneer or solicit votes for any political party, political body or candidate, nor shall any written or printed matter be posted up within the said room, except as required by this act. All persons, except election officers, clerks, machine inspectors, overseers, watchers, persons in the course of voting, persons lawfully giving assistance to voters, and peace and police officers, when permitted by the provisions of this act, must remain at least ten (10) feet distant from the polling place during the progress of the voting. (Pa. Consol. Stat. Ann. § 3060 (c); (d))

Rhode Island:

No person shall be allowed to display or distribute any poster, paper, circular, or other document or item designed or tending to aid, injure, or defeat any candidate for public office or any political party on any question submitted to the voters within fifty (50) feet of the entrance or entrances to the building in which voting is conducted at any primary or election. (Rhode Island Regulations for Polling Place Conduct Sec. 5(A))

South Carolina:

It is unlawful on an election day within two hundred feet of any entrance used by the voters to enter the polling place for a person to distribute any type of campaign literature or place any political posters. The poll manager shall use every reasonable means to keep the area within two hundred feet of any such entrance clear of political literature and displays, and the county and municipal law enforcement officers, upon request of a poll manager, shall remove or cause to be removed any material within two hundred feet of any such entrance distributed or displayed in violation of this section. A candidate may wear within two hundred feet of the polling place a label no larger than four and one-fourth inches by four and one-fourth inches that contains the candidate’s name and the office he is seeking. If the candidate enters the polling place, he may not display any of this identification including, but not limited to, campaign stickers or buttons. (S.C. Code Ann. § 17-25-180)

South Dakota:

Except for sample ballots and materials and supplies necessary for the conduct of the election, no person may, in any polling place or within or on any building in which a polling place is located or within one hundred feet from any entrance leading into a polling place, maintain an office or public address system, or use any communication or photographic device in a manner which repeatedly distracts, interrupts, or intimidates any voter or election worker, or display campaign posters, signs, or other campaign materials or by any like means solicit any votes for or against any person or political party or position on a question submitted or which may be submitted. No person may engage in any practice which interferes with the voter’s free access to the polls or disrupts the administration of the polling place, or conduct any petition signature gathering, on the day of an election within one hundred feet of a polling place. The term, polling place, means a designated place voters may go to vote on the day of the election or go to vote absentee. A violation of this section is a Class 2 misdemeanor. (S.D. Codified Laws § 12-8-3)

Tennessee:

The officer of elections…shall measure off one hundred feet (100′) from the entrances to the building in which the election is to be held and place boundary signs at that distance. Within the appropriate boundary as established in subsection (a), and the building in which the polling place is located, the display of campaign posters, signs or other campaign materials, distribution of campaign materials, and solicitation of votes for or against any person, political party, or position on a question are prohibited. No campaign posters, signs or other campaign literature may be displayed on or in any building in which a polling place is located. (Tenn. Code. Ann. § 2-7-111(a); (b)(1))

Texas:

A person commits an offense if, during the voting period and within 100 feet of an outside door through which a voter may enter the building in which a polling place is located, the person: (1) loiters; or (2) electioneers for or against any candidate, measure, or political party. The entity that owns or controls a public building being used as a polling place may not, at any time during the voting period, prohibit electioneering on the building’s premises outside of the area described in Subsection (a), but may enact reasonable regulations concerning the time, place, and manner of electioneering. “Electioneering” includes the posting, use, or distribution of political signs or literature. An offense under this section is a Class C misdemeanor. (Tex. Elections Code Ann. § 61.003)

Utah:

A person may not, within a polling place or in any public area within 150 feet of the building where a polling place is located: (i) do any electioneering; (ii) circulate cards or handbills of any kind; (iii) solicit signatures to any kind of petition; or (iv) engage in any practice that interferes with the freedom of voters to vote or disrupts the administration of the polling place. A county, municipality, school district, or local district may not prohibit electioneering that occurs more than 150 feet from the building where a polling place is located, but may regulate the place and manner of that electioneering to protect the public safety. “Electioneering” includes any oral, printed, or written attempt to persuade persons to refrain from voting or to vote for or vote against any candidate or issue (Utah Code Ann. § 20A- 3-501(1)(a); 2(a))

Vermont:

The presiding officer shall insure during polling hours that: (1) within the building containing a polling place, no campaign literature, stickers, buttons, name stamps, information on write-in candidates or other political materials are displayed, placed, handed out or allowed to remain; and (2) within the building containing a polling place, no candidate, election official or other person distributes election materials, solicits voters, or otherwise campaigns. (Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 17, § 2508)

Virginia:

During the times the polls are open and ballots are being counted, it shall be unlawful for any person (i) to loiter or congregate within 40 feet of any entrance of any polling place; (ii) within such distance to give, tender, or exhibit any ballot, ticket, or other campaign material to any person or to solicit or in any manner attempt to influence any person in casting his vote; or (iii) to hinder or delay a qualified voter in entering or leaving a polling place. (Va. Code Ann. § 24.2-604(A))

Washington:

During the voting period that begins eighteen days before and ends the day of a special election, general election, or primary, no person may, within a voting center: (a) suggest or persuade or attempt to suggest or persuade any voter to vote for or against any candidate or ballot measure; (b) circulate cards or handbills of any kind; (c) solicit signatures to any kind of petition; or (d) engage in any practice which interferes with the freedom of voters to exercise their franchise or disrupts the administration of the voting center. (Wash. Rev. Code § 29A.84.510)

West Virginia:

No person may do any electioneering on election day within any polling place, or within three hundred feet of the outside entrance to the building housing the polling place. No person may apply for or receive any ballot in any polling place, other than that in which he is entitled to vote, nor may any person examine a ballot which any voter has prepared for voting, or solicit the voter to show the same, nor ask, nor make any arrangement, directly or indirectly, with any voter, to vote an open ballot Whoever violates any provision of this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor. (W. Va. Code § 3-9-9) No person, other than the election officers and voters going to the election room to vote and returning therefrom, may be or remain within three hundred feet of the outside entrance to the building housing the polling place while the polls are open. This subsection does not apply to persons who reside or conduct business within such distance of the entrance to the building housing the polling place, while in the discharge of their legitimate business, or to persons whose business requires them to pass and repass within three hundred feet of such entrance. (W. Va. Code § 3-1-37)

Wisconsin:

No person may engage in electioneering during polling hours on any public property on election day within 100 feet of an entrance to a building containing a polling place. This subsection does not apply to the placement of any material on the bumper of a motor vehicle that is parked or operated at a place and time where electioneering is prohibited under this subsection. In this section, “electioneering” means any activity which is intended to influence voting at an election.(Wis. Stat. § 12.03(2)(b)(1), (d); (4))

Wyoming:

Electioneering too close to a polling place… when voting is being conducted, consists of any form of campaigning, including the display of campaign signs or distribution of campaign literature, the soliciting of signatures to any petition or the canvassing or polling of voters, except exit polling by news media, within one hundred (100) yards of the building in which the polling place is located. (Wyo. Stat. Ann. § 22-26-113)